Ollerton & Boughton Neighbourhood Study

URBED have been commissioned by Newark & Sherwood District Council to undertake a piece of work as part of the Ollerton & Boughton Neighbourhood Study, looking at options for a new housing development between the Hallam Road and Retford Road Estates. The land has been allocated for a mix of housing, open space and community uses under Policy OB/MU/2 in the Allocations and Development Management DPD, which was adopted in July 2013.

The Council wish to bring forward a high quality development of approximately 120 new homes which enhances and improves connections to both the Hallam Road and Retford Road Estates. The Council were keen to undertake this piece of work in collaboration with local residents and the first part of the study has been carried out by consultation experts Planning for Real between August and September 2017. 

URBED 's role on the project is to take on board local people's comments and views of the new development and draw up a series of masterplan options for the site. URBED are working alongside Aspinall Verdi, who will be providing market assessment and delivery advice for the scheme.

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Project blog

21.06.2019, 15:29
Public Consultation

Over the course of the following months, the design underwent several iterations as land to the south of the designated 'site' was considered for redevelopment and community uses.

The design process and resulting preferred option were displayed at a public exhibition at the Dukeries Leisure Centre on 2nd October 2018. The drop-in session ran between 3pm and 7pm, and local residents and stakeholders were invited via flyers posted through letter boxes, and additional posters put up around the estate.

The event was hosted by members of Newark and Sherwood District Council, Planning for Real, and URBED, with 11 display boards created by URBED to explain the discussions and outputs of the neighbourhood study. The Public Consultation was well attended, with good representation from local residents. Many attendees had contributed to the original People Report consultation, and were glad that their views had been taken into account.

 

 

This design was preferred, as the most viable scheme for the site, accomodating the greatest number of new homes whilst also delivering the largest amount of accessible recreational grounds. This is a viable development scheme that can deliver both affordable housing and generate funding (through Section 106 contributions) to facilitate the desired amenities suggested within the People Report.

This design contains 200 housing units, which are divided between three smaller linked neighbourhoods: the woodland enclosure, the central ‘park view’ homes, and the southern belt of homes, which occupy the current football pitch site. Removal of the fence and some hedges between the estates and the sports grounds to the south, allows residents to access a much larger football and play space.

 

 

Managing Expectations

It was important to re-iterate at the exhibition that this is still only a preferred option, tested for feasibility purposes, and not a finalised planning application, and that there would be a further process of site analysis, design testing and financial appraisals, were this scheme to go forwards.

11.11.2017, 15:39
Developing Options

Initial stakeholder and resident workshops were held in September 2017, following a summer of public consultation co-ordinated by Planning for Real. On the 17th October 2017, URBED presented three options, based on earlier diagrams produced by each of the stakeholder groups, and taking on board the planning policy guidelines for the site. 

 

Option 1 - Connect the two exiting estates with dense scheme

 

 

Option 2 - create two smaller separated new neighbourhoods in opposite corners of the site

 

 

Option 3 - Link the existing estates but deter from 'rat-run' with weaving road. Creating overlooking onto public space

 

Feedback from the presentation of these options was collated and a preferred scheme started to emerge, combining many of the benefits of options 1 and 3.