Beeston Park Phase 1

Illustrative Masterplan
Illustrative Masterplan
Section through road
Section through road
Section through street and sqaure
Section through street and sqaure
Meadow Seasons
Meadow Seasons
Meadow Section
Meadow Section
Example SUDS Catchment
Example SUDS Catchment
Material Palette
Material Palette

URBED were appointed by TOWN and U + I to develop a Reserved Matters Application to bring forward infrastructure works for Phase 1 at Beeston Park. In a model that could help to bring forward more sites for housing forward U+I will act as masterdevelopers by unlocking the site through the delivery of the primary roads and SUDS system. This creates a series of serviced development parcels that can be brought forward concurrently by a range of different developers.

The first phase forms part of the wider Beeston Park development designed by Paul Murrain and builds upon the foundations set out within the Outline Planning Application and Design Code. Working alongside Civic Engineers, Urban Engineering Studio and PBA URBED have provided Masterplanning and Landscape Design Services to the project.

The scheme, for around 1,400 homes is based around a permeable network of streets and squares designed to encourage walking and cycling as well as integrating a series of 9 SUDS drainage ponds across the site.  The drainage ponds have been designed as dual-purpose spaces providing both water attenuation when required as well as informal play and recreation spaces.

A series of shared spaces have been introduced at key junctions along the primary route to reduce traffic flows as well as easy pedestrian and cycle crossing. A segregated cycle route is also provided on both sides of primary street with priority given to cyclists and pedestrians at all junctions. 

 

Landscape Approach

As part of the wider Beeston Park urban extension, phase one is situated at the threshold between Norwich and its countryside.

The East-West Link Road serves as the central spine defined by a Tilia cordata ‘Greenspire’ tree avenue that turns golden yellow in autumn. The shared surface areas, ‘nodes’ along this spine mark the interaction points and change in direction, creating moments of interest and connecting the various pocket parks on either side.

The linearity of vegetational patterns at various scales follows the mosaic farming field typology, with meadows, shrubs and hedgerows as ecological streets. Planted with rustic and native species, they improve mitigation, enrich biodiversity and create ecological value.

The landscape remains dynamic and can become more and more “wild” as a result of the passage of time. It offers diversity for activities dedicated to formal sports (cricket, football, rugby) and informal nature play, as well as scenic spaces for contemplation.

Key points:

  • Inspired by the rural landscapes of the surrounding countryside, the meadows are represented through a differentiated management strategy.
  • Low maintenance.
  • Meadows are maintained according with the flowering times and community users.
  • Formalised desire lines are regularly mowed as part of the landscape maintenance and design strategy.
  • The ever-changing landscape encourages the creation of desire-lines making it more informal and dynamic over time.

 

 

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